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Housing Delivery Test 2019 Results Published

The Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) has now published the latest results of its Housing Delivery Test (HDT), based on the number of new homes built in the period 2016 to 2019.

The HDT 2019 measurement for each council area is provided in the searchable table below.
How the Housing Delivery Test is calculated The HDT calculates the number of new homes built, as a percentage of the number of homes needed over the past three years. MHCLG re-calculates an HDT figure annually for every council area in England. The new 2019 measurement replaces the previous 2018 measurement.
Consequences of the Housing Delivery Test The purpose of the HDT is to hold local authorities to account over the supply of new housing.

Where the HDT shows the delivery of new homes has fallen below 95% of the district or borough's housing requirement over the previous three years, the council should prepare an Action Plan to assess the causes of under-delivery and identify actions to…
Recent posts

Exciting changes to the Plan Finder...

I've given the Neighbourhood Plan Finder a major upgrade, transforming it into a fully fledged web app!

Loyal readers will know that this site provides the most comprehensive directory of made Neighbourhood Plans on the web. However, the original Plan Finder was a little 'clunky'.

The new and improved Plan Finder offers better results and improved functionality, enabling users to perform a simple search to locate made Neighbourhood Plans. For example, with the new Plan Finder you can search for Neighbourhood Plans by:
Name or location of Neighbourhood PlanLocal Planning Authority e.g. district or borough councilCountyNational ParkReferendum date, in format "YYYY-MM-DD" e.g. a search for '2019-12' will return plans which passed referendum in December 2019. This directory of Neighbourhood Plans is intended to raise the profile of Neighbourhood Plans by helping people to find plans more easily. For example, helping developers and agents to locate plans which…

Attitudes to house building

Neighbourhood Plans must provide a shared vision for their area, with consultation with the local community forming a key part of their preparation.

Critically, Neighbourhood Plans must pass a referendum in which local people are invited to vote on whether the plan should be used in decision-making. Therefore a plan's success is dependent on community support.

Many Neighbourhood Plans take on the challenge of planning for housing development, an issue which can prove divisive for some communities.

The Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government has recently reported its latest research on public attitudes to house building. The report presents findings from the 2018 British Social Attitudes Survey. This annual survey provides interesting insight into changing views over time.
Support and opposition for house building  The 2018 survey found that the majority of people support house building. 57% of people support more homes being built in the local area. However almost…

Neighbourhood Plan Review: Plans Made in September 2019

This post explores Neighbourhood Plans which successfully passed referendum in September 2019, highlighting elements which make each plan locally specific and unique. The following Neighbourhood Plans passed referendum in September 2019:
Bawtry Neighbourhood Plan (Doncaster Council)Brackenfield Neighbourhood Plan (North East Derbyshire District Council)Chelford Neighbourhood Plan (Cheshire East Council)Congresbury Neighbourhood Plan (North Somerset Council)Glentworth Neighbourhood Plan (West Lindsey District Council)Hanslope Neighbourhood Plan (Milton Keynes Council)Hullavington Neighbourhood Plan (Wiltshire Council)Huntingdon Neighbourhood Plan (Huntingdonshire District Council)Misterton Neighbourhood Plan (Bassetlaw District Council)Moreton, Bobbingworth and the Lavers Neighbourhood Plan (Epping Forest District Council)Sedgefield Neighbourhood Plan (Durham County Council)Sedgeford Neighbourhood Plan (Kings Lynn & West Norfolk District Council)Sid Valley Neighbourhood Plan (Sidmo…

Putting Health & Wellbeing at the Heart of Neighbourhood Planning

The planning system's origins can be traced back to public health policies from the nineteenth century. Increases in population and the growth of towns created public health problems, and early legislation focused on creating sanitary conditions.

There is a sense that in recent decades planning has lost its way with health, yet our modern environments continue to have profound effects on our health and well-being. In the blog post What stops us from creating healthier places? author Rachel Toms notes that overall, the planning system has done a good job of designing infectious diseases out of the places in which people live, but has "inadvertently contributed to sedentary lifestyles, mental distress and social isolation".

Whilst the planning system has cured the public health problems of the industrial revolution, it faces a new set of public health challenges for the modern era.

In this post, I make the case for prioritising health and wellbeing through Neighbourhood P…

Neighbourhood Planning and Community Health and Wellbeing - Briefing Note for NALC

I have teamed up with the National Association of Local Councils (NALC) to author a briefing note on Neighbourhood Planning and Community Health and Wellbeing.

The briefing note illustrates how Neighbourhood Plans can actively contribute to improving health and wellbeing in their communities, and draws on recent examples of neighbourhood plan policies. Neighbourhood Plans can tackle issues of health and wellbeing in lots of different ways, as explained in the briefing note, and is something I will be making the case for in future blog posts.

A pdf version of the briefing note is available to view and download below. Further advice on neighbourhood planning is also available from NALC's website.




Neighbourhood Plan Review: Plans Made in August 2019

No two Neighbourhood Plans are alike, although many have similar characteristics and address common themes. This post provides a short summary of those Neighbourhood Plans which successfully passed referendum in August 2019, highlighting the elements which make each plan locally specific and unique.

August plans contained lessons in semantics; aspirations for "harmonious living" for those with specialist housing needs; support for rural enterprise through homes on the farm;  biodiversity off-setting; and protection of essential local facilities - notably, the public toilet. August saw a plan which previously fell foul of the regulations finally find success; and several 'concise' plans pass referendum - the shortest containing just three policies.

Navigate this post using the links...
Broadwas and Cotheridge Neighbourhood PlanBroadwindsor Neighbourhood PlanChirton and Conock Neighbourhood PlanCrowan Parish Neighbourhood PlanHailey Neighbourhood PlanHaughley Neighbourh…