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Housing Delivery Test 2019 Results Published


Housing Delivery Test 2019 Checker
The Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) has now published the latest results of its Housing Delivery Test (HDT), based on the number of new homes built in the period 2016 to 2019.

The HDT 2019 measurement for each council area is provided in the searchable table below.

How the Housing Delivery Test is calculated

The HDT calculates the number of new homes built, as a percentage of the number of homes needed over the past three years. MHCLG re-calculates an HDT figure annually for every council area in England. The new 2019 measurement replaces the previous 2018 measurement.

Consequences of the Housing Delivery Test

The purpose of the HDT is to hold local authorities to account over the supply of new housing.

Where the HDT shows the delivery of new homes has fallen below 95% of the district or borough's housing requirement over the previous three years, the council should prepare an Action Plan to assess the causes of under-delivery and identify actions to increase delivery in future years.

Where the HDT shows a district's housing delivery is less than 85%, the council must add an additional buffer when calculating its Five Year Land Supply - equivalent to one extra year's worth of housing.

Where an area's HDT figure falls below 45%, the 'presumption in favour of sustainable development' must be applied - meaning relevant planning policies have diminished status when determining planning applications.

Implications for Neighbourhood Plans

Whilst the HDT is intended to punish local planning authorities for poor housing deliver. However it can have severe implications for the status of Neighbourhood Plans by rendering some policies 'out of date'. See my blog post "Presumption-proofing" Neighbourhood Plans for more info.

Eight local authority areas are now facing the presumption in favour of sustainable development, as a consequence of the HDT 2019 measurement. Details of Neighbourhood Plans by local authority area can be found using the Neighbourhood Plan Finder.

This 2019 measurement saw the threshold for applying the 'presumption' increase from 25% (in 2018) to 45%. The 2020 measurement (due to be published in 2021) will see the threshold further increase to 75%.

The HDT is a genuine threat to neighbourhood planning, undermining the efforts of those communities who have gone to the effort of writing a Neighbourhood Plan where housing delivery has been poor across the wider district or borough area.

Housing Delivery Test 2019 Measurement Checker

Find HDT 2019 measurement by searching the table below. For each local authority area the HDT checker shows the number of homes required and delivered over the three year period 2016-19, the HDT measurement (%), and the consequence the area faces as a result of the HDT 2019 measurement.  Try searching:
  • by name of Local Authority area, or 
  • HDT consequence to return all areas which have been subject to sanctions (e.g. "Presumption" to return areas facing the 'presumption in favour of sustainable development').

Search for HDT 2019 results...


Name of areaTotal no. of homes required 2016-19Total no. of homes delivered 2016-19HDT 2019 measure-mentHDT 2019 con-sequence
Adur53230056%Buffer
Allerdale3511067304%None
Amber Valley11341811160%None
Arun2934199768%Buffer
Ashfield1399132795%None
Ashford2456217388%Action plan
Aylesbury Vale34494495130%None
Babergh9261136123%None
Barking and Dagenham3708190251%Buffer
Barnet6832613990%Action plan
Barnsley26002847110%None
Barrow-in-Furness0335NANone
Basildon2506109344%Presumption
Basingstoke and Deane24532587105%None
Bassetlaw9191444157%None
Bath and North East Somerset15553810245%None
Bedford32063996125%None
Bexley12391608130%None
Birmingham78529487121%None
Blaby8931853207%None
Blackburn with Darwen591903153%None
Blackpool362525145%None
Bolsover683835122%None
Bolton2496144958%Buffer
Boston7591136150%None
Bournemouth3064201066%Buffer
Bracknell Forest1687166299%None
Bradford5138481994%Action plan
Braintree1992133767%Buffer
Breckland17782076117%None
Brent45754890107%None
Brentwood108357453%Buffer
Brighton and Hove1965137170%Buffer
Bristol, City of6097533187%Action plan
Bromley19232174113%None
Bromsgrove1458101670%Buffer
Broxbourne1343108281%Buffer
Broxtowe104090187%Action plan
Burnley194787405%None
Bury1687103461%Buffer
Calderdale2440116048%Buffer
Cambridge13793856280%None
Camden3360292487%Action plan
Cannock Chase7191233172%None
Canterbury2275198387%Action plan
Carlisle6031671277%None
Castle Point89048054%Buffer
Central Bedfordshire58606018103%None
Charnwood24003167132%None
Chelmsford23213266141%None
Cheltenham10331830177%None
Cherwell18703978213%None
Cheshire East30847089230%None
Cheshire West and Chester18076897382%None
Chesterfield69445265%Buffer
Chichester13041738133%None
Chiltern726877121%None
Chorley15151751116%None
City of London2758832%Presumption
Colchester27703392122%None
Copeland115403351%None
Corby12661604127%None
Cornwall71609610134%None
Cotswold10032507250%None
County Durham39694620116%None
Coventry34623723108%None
Craven418710170%None
Crawley6311487235%None
Croydon49396544132%None
Dacorum13791900138%None
Darlington5411303241%None
Dartford19913206161%None
Daventry19062231117%None
Derby17582307131%None
Derbyshire Dales643943147%None
Doncaster17153584209%None
Dover1471135192%Action plan
Dudley17992087116%None
Ealing35254214120%None
East Cambridgeshire139292266%Buffer
East Devon20922534121%None
East Hampshire14452489172%None
East Hertfordshire2418212188%Action plan
East Lindsey11891298109%None
East Northamptonshire11121386125%None
East Riding of Yorkshire28233786134%None
East Staffordshire12602040162%None
Eastbourne119946038%Presumption
Eastleigh17752572145%None
Eden301689229%None
Elmbridge142182458%Buffer
Enfield2394183977%Buffer
Epping Forest2266113950%Buffer
Epsom and Ewell137467349%Buffer
Erewash110068562%Buffer
Exeter15191968130%None
Fareham94493799%None
Fenland1414129492%Action plan
Forest Heath9541142120%None
Forest of Dean88778689%Action plan
Fylde7881438183%None
Gateshead135381360%Buffer
Gedling122470758%Buffer
Gloucester10801654153%None
Gosport51044687%Action plan
Gravesham97573475%Buffer
Great Yarmouth90269977%Buffer
Greenwich6432577590%Action plan
Guildford1627134383%Buffer
Hackney4797418087%Action plan
Halton8041665207%None
Hambleton5911438243%None
Hammersmith and Fulham21743676169%None
Harborough13381777133%None
Haringey4506248855%Buffer
Harlow11501297113%None
Harrogate10581641155%None
Harrow15652646169%None
Hart7411787241%None
Hartlepool585824141%None
Hastings60950984%Buffer
Havant11951206101%None
Havering3510116733%Presumption
Herefordshire, County of2237179880%Buffer
Hertsmere12961609124%None
High Peak7991214152%None
Hillingdon14622696184%None
Hinckley and Bosworth12231456119%None
Horsham23363448148%None
Hounslow24662571104%None
Huntingdonshire22952531110%None
Hyndburn212416196%None
Ipswich131961146%Buffer
Isle of Wight1727105061%Buffer
Isles of Scilly01NANone
Islington3792238863%Buffer
Kensington and Chelsea123470357%Buffer
Kettering14171845130%None
King's Lynn and West Norfolk1504124583%Buffer
Kingston upon Hull, City of13622649194%None
Kingston upon Thames1649128878%Buffer
Kirklees4704385982%Buffer
Knowsley7751941250%None
Lambeth35854320121%None
Lancaster10891454134%None
Leeds78238534109%None
Leicester37144951133%None
Lewes82476393%Action plan
Lewisham40784111101%None
Lichfield10761639152%None
Liverpool44738103181%None
Luton12752363185%None
Maidstone26423577135%None
Maldon750751100%None
Manchester71347099100%None
Mansfield784863110%None
Medway4328197846%Buffer
Melton507507100%None
Mendip12571590127%None
Merton12071330110%None
Mid Devon9531290135%None
Mid Suffolk1435142199%None
Mid Sussex2444233395%None
Middlesbrough7441592214%None
Milton Keynes4793449594%Action plan
Mole Valley1123100489%Action plan
New Forest2415103843%Presumption
Newark and Sherwood12801726135%None
Newcastle upon Tyne26586512245%None
Newcastle-under-Lyme91189298%None
Newham6740521077%Buffer
North Dorset74152471%Buffer
North East Derbyshire744867117%None
North East Lincolnshire689893130%None
North Hertfordshire2395104244%Presumption
North Lincolnshire131698375%Buffer
North Norfolk13301530115%None
North Somerset3121244478%Buffer
North Tyneside22092819128%None
North Warwickshire572890156%None
North West Leicestershire9422535269%None
Northampton19512478127%None
Northumberland19724709239%None
Nottingham28413823135%None
Nuneaton and Bedworth1637159998%None
Oadby and Wigston316375119%None
Oldham1822117665%Buffer
Oxford1646115170%Buffer
Pendle529628119%None
Peterborough26733039114%None
Poole1710127074%Buffer
Portsmouth20602455119%None
Preston7452327313%None
Purbeck41128670%Buffer
Reading15802615165%None
Redbridge3370201760%Buffer
Redcar and Cleveland3861461379%None
Redditch296155076%None
Reigate and Banstead13801639119%None
Ribble Valley4291193278%None
Richmond upon Thames9451147121%None
Richmondshire94813863%None
Rochdale13621947143%None
Rochford87667777%Buffer
Rossendale61046677%Buffer
Rother100670670%Buffer
Rotherham1754149985%Action plan
Rugby17391910110%None
Runnymede13441651123%None
Rushcliffe15201876123%None
Rushmoor7911117141%None
Rutland341721212%None
Ryedale462872189%None
Salford38587161186%None
Sandwell4118242359%Buffer
Scarborough5001410282%None
Sedgemoor17422118122%None
Sefton17091740102%None
Selby10441801173%None
Sevenoaks1712121271%Buffer
Sheffield58426528112%None
Shepway12481579127%None
Shropshire32785629172%None
Slough2528191176%Buffer
Solihull20002105105%None
South Bucks10731196111%None
South Cambridgeshire2675252995%None
South Derbyshire20932992143%None
South Gloucestershire35904802134%None
South Holland11941390116%None
South Kesteven1947160282%Buffer
South Lakeland565987175%None
South Northamptonshire17362299132%None
South Oxfordshire14663022206%None
South Ribble691986143%None
South Somerset1899183497%None
South Staffordshire643758118%None
South Tyneside105399294%Action plan
Southampton24153599149%None
Southend-on-Sea2848149352%Buffer
Southwark7047655293%Action plan
Spelthorne150990460%Buffer
St Albans2219139763%Buffer
St Edmundsbury1144107994%Action plan
St. Helens14541673115%None
Stafford11572572222%None
Staffordshire Moorlands55143879%Buffer
Stevenage11201262113%None
Stockport2856212774%Buffer
Stockton-on-Tees15802489158%None
Stoke-on-Trent14172467174%None
Stratford-on-Avon14864028271%None
Stroud13741424104%None
Suffolk Coastal13591720127%None
Sunderland16342520154%None
Surrey Heath781947121%None
Sutton12812013157%None
Swale2328180277%Buffer
Swindon31243557114%None
Tameside2016150875%Buffer
Tamworth371628169%None
Tandridge154177650%Buffer
Taunton Deane15802376150%None
Teignbridge16562088126%None
Telford and Wrekin14863628244%None
Tendring20992138102%None
Test Valley12912522195%None
Tewkesbury14862580174%None
Thanet261692335%Presumption
Three Rivers136756041%Presumption
Thurrock2835186866%Buffer
Tonbridge and Malling20952451117%None
Torbay1365127193%Action plan
Tower Hamlets10318778075%Buffer
Trafford3142181558%Buffer
Tunbridge Wells1795154686%Action plan
Uttlesford17492677153%None
Vale of White Horse18964483236%None
Wakefield29625689192%None
Walsall2486198880%Buffer
Waltham Forest24302590107%None
Wandsworth47196605140%None
Warrington2581135452%Buffer
Warwick23653048129%None
Watford137195670%Buffer
Waveney98387389%Action plan
Waverley1614137585%Action plan
Wealden2284189683%Buffer
Wellingborough91386294%Action plan
Welwyn Hatfield2034144871%Buffer
West Berkshire14691601109%None
West Lancashire547949173%None
West Oxfordshire16461875114%None
West Somerset32226983%Buffer
Westminster30223087102%None
Wigan28423115110%None
Wiltshire53748006149%None
Winchester15712191139%None
Windsor and Maidenhead1966190597%None
Wirral2192166476%Buffer
Woking102298897%None
Wokingham21563780175%None
Wolverhampton19772099106%None
Worthing2093113954%Buffer
Wycombe14742352160%None
Wyre8631268147%None
Wyre Forest63663099%None
York2662216081%Buffer
Source: MHCLG

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